Content Services, Not ECM


Recently I’ve been trying to walk a narrow path. I have all but pronounced Enterprise Content Management (ECM) dead, and yet I have expressed a belief that Content Services need to be embedded into business applications.

The question is two-fold. How can you serve Content Services without a platform? Isn’t that ECM with a different name?

Yes and no.

Let’s dissect this apparent contradiction.

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Don’t Make Your Digital Assets a Silo


I wrote a piece for CMSWire last month asking if Content Management Systems were Good Enough for Digital Asset Management. I essentially said that if digital assets are the business, then a Digital Asset Management (DAM) system makes sense. If digital assets are part of a broader business need or solution, then perhaps the capabilities of a broader Content Management System (CMS) would suffice.

Ralph Windsor took exception at my conclusion, thinking I was pushing the same old Enterprise Content Management (ECM) story. He couldn’t be further from the truth.

Let me tell you why.

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Why CMIS 1.1 Is Pretty Awesome


Before I get to the meat of this post, I want to start with a confession. I have been a slacker. If you look at my word cloud to the right, you’ll see CMIS as a big piece of the proverbial Pie. Even before it was a public term, I railed for the need for a standard in the Content Management space.

Now that the first update to the Content Management Interoperability Standard (CMIS) has been out for nearly three months, why am I just now blogging about it? Now that  browser binding, retention, holds, and type mutability have been added to CMIS, why am I not proclaiming the wonders of CMIS 1.1 from every rooftop.

I…uh…got busy.

What I want to do today is talk about why this update means everyone should be looking deeper into CMIS and reconsider it for every Content application created. In fact, as much as the need for standards in Content Management existed when I started writing about them, it is even more urgent today.

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Content, Security, and Standards


imageI am about to do what I stopped doing several years ago, start paying attention to James McGovern. Why? Because he is talking about several important issues that need to be dealt with in the industry.

Years ago, James and I discussed Security standards around Identity Management, primarily SAML. While my focus on the time was on Documentum, the issues were universal. Since we last interacted online, James has moved on to HP in an advisory role for clients.

Sadly, the issues we discussed are still prevalent in the industry. In fact, these issues are becoming more important with the advent of new players in the cloud space.

Sure, the new vendors support integrations and work with existing Active Directory installations. That’s nice. So did the established vendors. The problem remains, there is no standard way to pass both Authentication and Authorization.

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Sitecore Sym NA: Sitecore Roadmap


One more session today, the Product Roadmap. Normally I prefer these sessions in the morning so I have time for the entire conference to follow-up. Given that I personally needed more background first, I’ll let it slide. Once again, Darren Guarnaccia is speaking. Dude is earning his pay today.

  • CMS 6.6 this quarter, November 5, 2012
    • Mobile SDK, Device simulation, MVC (new development approach)
    • Mobile SDK, build mobile apps with Sitecore managed content
      • iOS first, Android later
      • Restful API’s that are optimized for mobile applications
      • Device Specific API’s, First for iOS devices in Objective C
      • SDK for creating an “App Shell”
    • Device simulation allows viewing a page in different simulated mobile devices through page editor

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Sitecore Sym NA: Leveraging SEO to Drive Measureable Customer Engagement


Here to hear Ted Prodromou talk about Search Engine Optimization (SEO). Any tidbit that I learn that can help us is important.

  • Good Old Days, SEO 1.0, was easy back then
    • Meta fields, repeating terms, keyword stuffing, and links all USED to work well
    • Meta Titles still works well
    • Meta Description is useful because it will show-up in the Google result (helps people choose your result)
  • Panda and Penquin (monthly) updates to cut down on cheating
  • Thriving in current SEO world

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