InfoGovCon 2017 Continues to Set the Bar High


Governor Raimondo speaks at InfoGov17This post has been a long time in coming because I’ve been trying to process everything that happened this year. Once again, InfoGovCon was a great event and the Information Coalition should be proud at the quality of speakers that they assembled. After all, how many conferences score a governor and get them to talk about something relevant?

Conferences like InfoGovCon are critical for the industry. We are still building a template for consistent success. As Shannon Harmon, whom I had the pleasure to meet this year, put it,

The best practices are still being developed. The body of knowledge is under construction.  This makes information governance an exciting space within which to work.  It can also be immensely frustrating for those who want a well-defined structure in place.  Working in this space requires a certain comfort level with the unknown.

After decades of working in this space, I agree that there are still some unknowns. We have learned a lot about what NOT to do. It is the way we can get things done consistently that we are still putting together.

Building the InfoBok

One topic of discussion was the InfoBOK (Information Body of Knowledge). The Information Coalition (IC) has been working on this for a bit and it is taking shape. Led by D Madrid, it is meant to capture information across all the relevant information areas of Information Governance.

It is a valiant effort that the IC is undertaking. Will it work? Time will tell but they are definitely focusing on a need that exists. There are books and training courses but creating an universally accessible body of knowledge has the potential to be a great benefit to the profession.

Thinking Outside the Box

Once again, Nick Inglis brought in a keynote speaker that was impactful and unexpected. This time it was the governor of Rhode Island, Gina Raimondo. She gave a great talk about implementers can work with clients to better understand and share risks. She stressed that there is no shame is taking a step back to make sure that something is done correctly. If every client had Governor Raimondo’s attitude, there would be a lot more successful tech implementations.

This year there was another panel on Increasing the Inclusivity of the Information Profession. D Madrid, Shannon Harmon, and Donda Young gave some great perspectives on what we all can do to increase diversity. It isn’t enough to recruit and train diverse people. You have to make sure that the environment is inclusive so the people you recruit stay and encourage others to join. There was a lot of good information and perspectives shared and kudos to the Information Coalition for putting this talk on the main stage where it belongs.

Making a Difference

You meet the strangest people at InfoGovCon and this year was no execption. (Love all these people)One thing is clear, the Information Coalition is working hard to serve the members of the Information Governance Community. While still a young organization, they are gradually expanding their services and starting to make a real impact.

Next year I’ll be back at InfoGovCon. It will be in Providence again and I have to admit, that city is starting to grow on me. In addition, the speakers and other attendees are slowly making InfoGovCon the must attend conference for practitioners. Not sure what the IC is going to do for next year’s conference but I can’t wait to find out.

The CIP, A Lost Opportunity


[EDIT: 1 week after killing it, AIIM restored the CIP after the community’s feelings about the CIP became known. Read my initial thoughts.]

Sadness from Inside Out CryingFor those that may not have heard, AIIM is killing off the Certified Information Professional (CIP) certification.

We’d like to share an exciting development with you.

To categorize the news as disappointing is a massive understatement. AIIM dumping the news on a Friday afternoon shows that AIIM knew that this would not be well received. In many ways I feel that AIIM has turned its back on the industry with this action. I am just a bit angry at that development.

Continue reading

Stop Talking about Backups Tapes!!!


Bookshelf of backup tapesThis isn’t a rant against backup tapes in IT infrastructure. This isn’t a rant about how backup strategies need to change. It is a rant about all the people that depend on backups for managing information.

Stop it!

Backup tapes are to restore your system when things go wrong. Period. If you have to keep something, don’t use tapes. There are other ways. There are several archive vendors out there that will gladly take your phone calls.

Tapes are even worse for this than other backup methods. Tapes degrade. Tapes become corrupted. Tapes are easy to lose. Tapes get out of order. Tapes take up space that we are trying to save by going digital.

Continue reading

Why Should We Get Out of Email?


Moses from History of the World Part 1Last week I had the privilege of having dinner with a brilliant gentleman from my college days, Alex. Some may know of Alex as he the person who is responsible for my moniker, “Pie.” We had a great conversation that was mostly devoid of ‘remember when’ threads.

Alex is an independent lawyer in a city in the southern US. He has been practicing for quite some time and after delving into what I do for a living, he went into a rant on legal discovery, both paper and electronic.

He flat out accused many law firms of making large discovery requests in order to make money reviewing the results. Regardless of the outcome of the case, the billable hours accrued can turn a tidy profit for a law firm. He even shared a story of one case when the amount of discovery turned out to be very small and the firm dropped the case as they wouldn’t be able to make money from it.

While not all firms are like that, it does trigger certain behaviors and advice that in the grand scheme should not occur. We should be working to do what is right for our organization without being scared of ‘what if’ scenarios.

Continue reading

Box Just Threw Down the Gauntlet


Clint Eastwood as Dirty HarryLast week, Box held their annual conference. Many announcements were expected and the announcement of Workflow coming to Box in 2015 was quite exciting. If you want a high-level look at everything that happened, check out Chris Walker’s quick thoughts on BoxWorks.

None of that is why I am writing this post.

Buried in the wave of tweets were two game-changing announcements. Box announced Retention Management and Auto-Classification of Content.

That’s right. Information Governance behind the scenes on an application that people actually use AND a way to get content in the right retention bucket without people having to intervene.

All in the cloud.

Continue reading

Executing on Information Governance


I had the pleasure of attending the Information Governance Exchange in Washington, DC last week. It was a different conference from many that I have attended in the past. Attended by senior people that own Information Governance at their organizations, there were a lot of discussions about how to execute strategies to making Information Governance work.

This was not theory, it was hard advice and grounded discussions. In fact, it was the most BS free Information Governance event I had ever attended.

Continue reading

The Two Sides of Information Governance


Sometimes things just fall together. This past weekend, I watched Raiders of the Lost Ark with my sons, reveling as they experienced all the quirks for the first time.

Then on Monday, I had a conversation about Information Governance with a fellow practitioner. They remarked that there were two pillars of Information Governance. At first I agreed, Value (Information Management) and Risk (Records Management/eDiscovery) are the two dynamics at play in Information Governance.

I then realized that they were really two sides of the same coin. They are not as separate as two pillars might be. They are intertwined. After a little thought, I decided that the headpiece to the Staff of Ra from the movie Raiders of the Lost Ark was actually the perfect paradigm.

Continue reading