InfoGovCon 2017 Continues to Set the Bar High


Governor Raimondo speaks at InfoGov17This post has been a long time in coming because I’ve been trying to process everything that happened this year. Once again, InfoGovCon was a great event and the Information Coalition should be proud at the quality of speakers that they assembled. After all, how many conferences score a governor and get them to talk about something relevant?

Conferences like InfoGovCon are critical for the industry. We are still building a template for consistent success. As Shannon Harmon, whom I had the pleasure to meet this year, put it,

The best practices are still being developed. The body of knowledge is under construction.  This makes information governance an exciting space within which to work.  It can also be immensely frustrating for those who want a well-defined structure in place.  Working in this space requires a certain comfort level with the unknown.

After decades of working in this space, I agree that there are still some unknowns. We have learned a lot about what NOT to do. It is the way we can get things done consistently that we are still putting together.

Building the InfoBok

One topic of discussion was the InfoBOK (Information Body of Knowledge). The Information Coalition (IC) has been working on this for a bit and it is taking shape. Led by D Madrid, it is meant to capture information across all the relevant information areas of Information Governance.

It is a valiant effort that the IC is undertaking. Will it work? Time will tell but they are definitely focusing on a need that exists. There are books and training courses but creating an universally accessible body of knowledge has the potential to be a great benefit to the profession.

Thinking Outside the Box

Once again, Nick Inglis brought in a keynote speaker that was impactful and unexpected. This time it was the governor of Rhode Island, Gina Raimondo. She gave a great talk about implementers can work with clients to better understand and share risks. She stressed that there is no shame is taking a step back to make sure that something is done correctly. If every client had Governor Raimondo’s attitude, there would be a lot more successful tech implementations.

This year there was another panel on Increasing the Inclusivity of the Information Profession. D Madrid, Shannon Harmon, and Donda Young gave some great perspectives on what we all can do to increase diversity. It isn’t enough to recruit and train diverse people. You have to make sure that the environment is inclusive so the people you recruit stay and encourage others to join. There was a lot of good information and perspectives shared and kudos to the Information Coalition for putting this talk on the main stage where it belongs.

Making a Difference

You meet the strangest people at InfoGovCon and this year was no execption. (Love all these people)One thing is clear, the Information Coalition is working hard to serve the members of the Information Governance Community. While still a young organization, they are gradually expanding their services and starting to make a real impact.

Next year I’ll be back at InfoGovCon. It will be in Providence again and I have to admit, that city is starting to grow on me. In addition, the speakers and other attendees are slowly making InfoGovCon the must attend conference for practitioners. Not sure what the IC is going to do for next year’s conference but I can’t wait to find out.

Focusing on the Local by Joining the NCC-AIIM Executive Committee


Hanging out at AIIM Nats night w/ (left to right) Mark Mandel, AIIM Vice-Chair Mark Patrick, and dedicated AIIM staffer Theresa ResekI’ve talked a little bit here about the need to improve the local communities for information management. It is an area that ARMA does better than other groups in the industry but their focus and members can be intimidating for those who aren’t records managers. AIIM chapters are a decent alternative but there are a lot of challenges.

For the past couple of years, I’ve been chatting offline with some chapter leaders from both associations, brainstorming ideas, and trying to think of ways to improve the local community. Some of these discussions became more focused when Kevin Parker became the president of the local AIIM chapter, NCC-AIIM. During one of these discussions I agreed to join the chapter’s executive committee.

Continue reading

Information Governance, Moving on from Content


Has Content build holding us prisoner, making us miss the bigger picture?When I dove into the debate on Content Services and ECM, my conclusion was fairly straightforward.

Look at your information flow. Follow it and find new ways to make it flow faster. If you can do that and know where your information is at anytime, you are done.

There is a lot of detail buried under that relatively straightforward statement. Content Services is part of a broader trend in the content management space and is here to stay. It has been here since CMIS (Content Management Interoperability Services) entered the picture almost a decade ago but now people are seeing it as more than a way to integrate systems.

The problem is that ECM (Enterprise Content Management) is still just part of the picture. Even if we use the latest tools without regard to the latest buzz words that define them. If we just focus on the content we are failing to solve what needs to be solved.

Continue reading

What is an Information Professional?


Beaker from the MuppetsOne thing I heard from MANY people at the AIIM conference was that the concept of an information professional as we understand it was flawed. The claim was that usage patterns of AIIM resources showed that members would join and engage to tackle a single project. Once that project was completed, they would leave AIIM and presumably go do something else that wasn’t information related. John Mancini, the outgoing CEO of AIIM, shared his thoughts on the current information professional in a four post series covering the history, evolution, environment, and future of the information professional.

Experience tells me that the conclusion is incorrect. There are a large number of people who spend careers in the space and dip into AIIM resources only periodically. It is also a conclusion is hard to confirm or deny because once they disengage from AIIM, it is tough to measure what people do next.

Continue reading

Pointing AIIM in the Right Direction


Jack's compass from Pirates in the CaribbeanThere are a lot of posts flying around about what information professionals need from an association. My discussion on too many associations seems to have struck a nerve and gotten people thinking. Before I dive into details regarding AIIM, I want to share these posts.

I’m not going to reference the posts moving forward but know that they have, to varying degrees, influenced this post. That said, I had a lot of thoughts on this topic already rattling around in my head. Many of the thoughts below have been shared with other previously as well to test them out.

There are two ways I can share my thoughts. I could rant and rave about everything AIIM is specifically doing wrong. It would get a lot of hits, generate a lot of discussion, and upset the very people who need to read this.

Or…

I can simply dive into what AIIM needs to do going forward. The past is written. The present is malleable. The future is fluid. It is the future that I wish to influence by helping form the present.

Continue reading

Moving AIIM’s Certified Information Professional Forward


New York CityIn December, the industry was faced with the prospect of a long needed certification being removed from the market. After the community protested that we need the CIP, AIIM backed off from closing the CIP and committed to updating it to reflect the changes in the industry since the CIP’s inception.

So far so good.

Now we the industry need to help AIIM make the CIP better. Chris Walker had some thoughts on ways to make the CIP more successful. Jesse Wilkins who runs the CIP program for AIIM made some requests from the industry on how we can support the CIP.

Now after having existing CIPs review an updated exam outline, AIIM is asking the industry to review the outline by this Friday, February 12.

Continue reading